THE BCH ARCHIVE

LOCAL HISTORY FOR

BIRTSMORTON

CASTLEMORTON

HOLLYBUSH

And The Surrounding District

Hollybed Farm

Other names:           Halliers, The Midden


Origin of name:      Family name. A Hallier is kind of net for catching birds.


Date built:          Before 1659


The earliest records are the Accounts of Receipts and Records for St Bartholomew's Hospital, Gloucester, part of Gloucester Municipal Charities, which begin in 1655. The property is referred to as House and Land at Castlemorton, but we can be confident that this is Hollybed Farm because there is a continuous record of tenancy through to 1835 when James Pingree was living there and we can him there in the 1838 Tithe. A Hospital meant a place for the sick and elderly, as well as those unwell, and it also provided overnight accommodation for travellers – hence the word 'hospitality'.


In 1655, the earliest St Bartholomew's register of rents, not found.


In 1659, rented to the widow Bray for £15:10s. A Margaret Bray, widow, was buried at St Gregory 30 July 1667.


In 1667, rented to Thomas Birchley.


In 1669, referred to as The Middens and rented to Thomas Birchley. An odd choice of name as a midden was a domestic refuse pit.


In 1685, rented to Samuel Birchley.


In 1715, rented to Samuel Birchley for £15:10s


In 1720, rented to William Birchley.


In 1739 it was rented to William Birchley at £15:10s a year, which was paid by Rev. W Jeffries. William died in April 1765


In 1766, it was taken over by Richard Cocks and by 1781 he was paying £40 a year,


In 1795, a 41 year lease was granted to Samuel Birchley (but in 1799 Richard Cocks was paying the rent).


In 1803, Samuel Birchley and John Barnes are join tenants and by 1811 they are paying separately – Richard £40 a year and John £45.


In 1817 the tenants are Thomas Tombs and John Barnes, paying £50 a year. From here on it called a farm.


In 1820, just Thomas Tombs is the tenant, paying £50 a year.


In 1835, James Pingree commenced his lease at £60 a year.


In 1839, named in the tithe as Halliers. 52 acres. Hunter's Hall was named after a Mr Hunter Hallier, so he may have once owned both farms. Nothing is known of him except that Hallier is a Gloucestershire surname.